St. Louis on the Air | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis on the Air

Noon-1 p.m. and 10-11 p.m. (repeat) Monday-Friday
  • Local Host Don Marsh

St. Louis on the Air creates a unique space where guests and listeners can share ideas and opinions with respect and honesty. Whether exploring issues and challenges confronting our region, discussing the latest innovations in science and technology, taking a closer look at our history or talking with authors, artists and musicians, St. Louis on the Air brings you the stories of St. Louis and the people who live, work and create in our region.

St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh and producers Mary Edwards and Alex Heuer give you the information you need to make informed decisions and stay in touch with our diverse and vibrant St. Louis region.

Ron Himes, Beverly Foster and Dr. John Morris discussed how Alzheimer's disease impacts African-American patients and families.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

African-Americans over the age of 70 are twice as likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease as white people. While there are no answers, said Dr. John Morris, director of the Knight Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center at Washington University, there are some factors that might be contributing to this gap.

Dogs and cats acting strangely? On Tuesday's St. Louis on the Air, an animal behaviorist stepped in to answer your questions about animal behavior.
tohu | Flickr

Dr. Debra Horwitz, DVM, a St. Louis-based veterinary behaviorist and veterinarian joined St. Louis on the Air again on Tuesday to share her pet wisdom and answer listeners’ questions about their dogs and cats. 

Here are some of the most pressing questions posed to Horwitz, of Veterinary Behavior Consultations, during the noon hour along with her answers.

Does tone matter when it comes to addressing dogs and cats?

Nine acts were invited by the St. Louis Blues to perform at a game this season.
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Louis Blues have invited nine acts to perform the national anthem at a game this upcoming season.

The invitations are the result of a partnership between the Blues and the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra, an audition process that took place on a recent Saturday at Powell Hall. The Blues and SLSO selected more than one winner after being impressed by the abundance of local talent.

Open to solo singers, groups and instrumentalists, more than 650 contestants sent in video applications. Thirty-four were invited to participate.

Annie Malone, Josephine Baker, King Baggot, Ginger Rogers and Jane Darwell are just a few people with St. Louis and Missouri ties who have made significant contributions to film.

St. Louis Public Radio reporter Jason Rosenbaum
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh spoke with St. Louis Public Radio political reporter Jason Rosenbaum about the ongoing fallout and what might happen after controversial comments made by a Democratic and Republican state legislator.

State Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal made a Facebook comment wishing for President Donald Trump’s assassination.

State Rep. Warren Love commented that people who damage Confederate statues should be found and hanged from a tree.

Agnes Wilcox and Freeman Word
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated on September 8, 2017:

A re-mix of “Then, and Now Again, a Workers’ Opera" will be performed on Sunday, September 10 at 1:00 p.m. at the Missouri History Museum in memory of Agnes Wilcox who passed away on August 28. The production will be directed by Freeman Word and is free and open to the public.

Famed author Salman Rushdie, visiting St. Louis this weekend to discuss his most recent novel, “The Golden House,” says that if you want to be a good writer, “you need to get into a lot of different kinds of rooms.”

He was referencing his knowledge of and imagination with the setting of his latest novel: a secluded garden in New York only accessible by the people whose homes abut the property. 

The Rep's 51st season.
(Courtesy: The Rep)

This week, The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis launches into the second half of its first century, embarking on its 51st season. It features a robust, wide-ranging lineup of productions from musicals to classics to two Tony Award-winning productions.

Steven Woolf, the theater company’s artistic director who recently announced he will retire from the company in two years, said the company is keeping up its momentum from its landmark 50th anniversary year.

Marie Griffith, director of the Danforth Center on Religion and Politics at Washington University, and John Danforth, a former Republican U.S. Senator from Missouri.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Late last month former U.S. Senator from Missouri John Danforth published an op-ed in the Washington Post in which he called President Donald Trump the “most divisive president in our history.” He called for fellow Republicans to disavow Trump’s divisive tactics and redefine the Republican party.

Dana Hotle, Kyle Lombard and Adam Manness dicussed the Chamber Project of Saint Louis' 10th season.
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

Can the story of the famed Dred Scott decision be effectively put to music? In this tenth year of the Chamber Project Saint Louis, composer Adam Manness is giving it a try.

Danielle Lee, visiting assistant professor at SIUE and advocate on access in STEM fields, joined host Don Marsh to discuss diversity in the sciences.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

While there’s a rising growth in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) jobs in the United States, there’s a dwindling number of Americans interested in and qualified for pursuing such careers. Animal behavioral scientist and Southern Illinois State University-Edwardsville visiting professor Danielle Lee wants to change that, particularly with populations traditionally underrepresented in those fields – women and minorities.

Marty Kady of Politico
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh spoke with Marty Kady, editorial director of Politico Pro, a paywalled subscription service of multiplatform political news entity Politico. The news service is for policy wonks, lobbyists and other Capitol Hill insiders, punching in at over $3,000 per year for a subscription.

“We try to understand the underpinning politics of individuals making decisions so we can explain substantive policy better,” Kady said.

Pulitzer Arts Foundation

Updated September 1 with St. Louis on the Air remembrance –

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh discussed the life and legacy of Agnes Wilcox, who died unexpectedly in Canada earlier this week.

Among the many people who could talk about Wilcox, the founder of Prison Performing Arts, three joined us:

Amid recent and ongoing destruction caused by Hurricane Harvey, the recovery effort will take center stage.

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked with Suzanna Long, professor and department chair of engineering management and systems engineering at Missouri S&T in Rolla.

They addressed what a comprehensive recovery plan looks like and assess the potential for disasters in Missouri.

Nudo House co-owners Qui Tran and Marie-Anne Velasco
Michelle Volansky | Sauce Magazine

The Sound Bites team at Sauce Magazine was back and provided some tips to help you plan your nights out at St. Louis restaurants during the month of September.

St. Louis-based author Ridley Pearson.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

This interview was re-broadcast on "St. Louis on the Air" at noon on Monday (Labor Day), September 4.

Originally published April 4, 2017:

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh was joined by bestselling St. Louis author Ridley Pearson to discuss his Disney side.

Maggie Menefee, Sylvia Jackson and Kristin Bulin work to assist victims of domestic violence.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

This interview was re-broadcast on "St. Louis on the Air" at noon on Monday (Labor Day), September 4.

Originally published April 4, 2017:

Derek Olson via Flickr

When should parents give children their first cellphone or smartphone? What factors should be considered? How do maturity, development and sleep considerations play into it all? 

St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh talked about the issues with two doctors:

St. Louis poet Alison Rollins
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis poet and librarian Alison Rollins started along her poetry journey in high school at Nerinx Hall in Webster Groves.

She is now a published poet, is pursuing a library sciences degree and is the librarian at the high school she attended.

Richard Dudman in 2014.
Family photo provided by Bill Freivogel

Earlier this month, longtime journalist Richard Dudman passed away at the age of 99.

Dudman led the Washington Bureau of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch from 1969 to 1981. In 1970, he was captured in Cambodia while reporting and held for 40 days. He wrote about the Kennedy assassination, the Bay of Pigs invasion, the Vietnam War, the Pentagon Papers and more.

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked about the life of Dudman with Bill and Margaret Wolf Freivogel, two people who knew him well.

Lois Wood, former executive director at Land of Lincoln Legal Assistance Foundation in East St. Louis
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

For 43 years, Lois Wood helped low income and elderly residents in Illinois receive legal assistance.

The executive director of the nonprofit Land of Lincoln Legal Assistance Foundation in East St. Louis retired a few weeks ago.

“It’s been a long time since I’ve had time off in any reasonable amount,” Wood said as she reflected on her long career with St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh.

Portion of Pageant and Masque panorama photo showing crew and assorted costumed cast members with Art Hill seating visible in the distance. Photograph, 1914. Missouri History Museum Photographs and Prints Collections.
Courtesy of the Missouri History Museum

A new 6,000-square-foot exhibit opening September 2nd at the Missouri History Museum contains panoramic photographs of St. Louis from 1900 to 1950.

“People are going to feel like they are stepping into a moment in St. Louis history,” said Adam Kloppe, public historian for the Missouri History Museum and content lead for “Panoramas of the City.”

The moments captured in the exhibit include the following 35 foot long photographs:

Walter Trout plays at the main stage of the Big Muddy Blues Festival in St. Louis on Sept. 1, 2013.
Fred Ortlip via Flickr

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, contributor Steve Potter talked about this year’s Big Muddy Blues Festival. The primarily outdoor festival takes place on Laclede's Landing and includes 50 acts on three stages, three indoor clubs and two events at the National Blues Museum.

“St. Louis has on the greatest heritages of music in the world. Often I think that we need national acts … but we have something special here in St. Louis so that’s what we’re featuring,” said Jeremy Segel-Moss, a musician and co-coordinator of the Big Muddy Blues Festival.

Jamie Sentnor (L) and Deborah Phelps (R) joined host Don Marsh to talk about caring for seriously ill relatives and for the people who provide care.
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

“The supply of family caregivers will not keep pace with the future demand as our population ages and people live with multiple complex chronic conditions,” argued the authors of a recent academic article in Generations: Journal of American Society on Aging.

This point highlights an impending shortage of caregivers but also of concern is how the people who take care of our older population are cared for themselves.

The Missouri Capitol building.
File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis’ $10-an-hour minimum wage is a thing of the past. So is a Missouri resident’s ability to sue when he or she thinks age or race was part of the reason for being fired.

That’s because several new laws have taken effect as of Monday.

An illustration of Missouri death-row inmate Marcellus Williams.
Rici Hoffarth | St. Louis Public Radio

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, we went Behind the Headlines to delve into the news that Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens granted a stay of execution for Marcellus Williams.

Elvert Barnes Protest Photography | Flickr

Updated Aug. 25 with "St. Louis on the Air" audio — An excerpt of a conversation with Dick Gregory from Jan. 2003.

Original story from Aug. 20:

As Dick Gregory’s brother tells it, the comedian and civil rights activist “just saw things that was wrong and decided ‘I was going to do whatever I could and right them.’”

It was that determination, Ron Gregory told St. Louis Public Radio in an interview Sunday, that pushed his brother beyond St. Louis’ confines and onto the national stage.

Choosing a wine can be a daunting task. Here are some tips to make it a little easier.
Sauce Magazine

Sound Bites is produced in partnership with Sauce Magazine, our monthly installment exploring cuisine in the St. Louis area.

If you’ve ever found yourself in the grocery store aisle, out to eat with family or friends or arriving to a BYOB party, you may have experienced that moment of crippling insecurity: do I go for the wine I know I like or the wine that will make me sound like I know what I’m doing? Oh, you haven’t experienced this? Maybe that’s just us here at St. Louis on the Air then…

A crane lifts the top off the Confederate Memorial in Forest Park on Thursday, June 8, 2017. A spokesman for Mayor Lyda Krewson says it will take a while to remove the entire piece.
Bill Greenblatt | UPI

A teacher at New City School in St. Louis is using the controversy over Confederate monuments, including the recently-removed Confederate Memorial in Forest Park, to teach fifth graders about diversity, inclusion and conflict resolution.

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, we heard from that teacher, Stephanie Teachout Allen, who also serves as director of diversity and inclusion at the school, and David Cunningham, a professor of sociology at Washington University, about how they have hosted these conversations with children and others in their lives.

Our monthly legal roundtable returns to discuss pressing issues of the law with Bill Freivogel, Rachel Sachs and Mark Smith.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, our monthly Legal Roundtable convened to discuss pressing issues of the law.

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