St. Louis on the Air

Monday - Thursday, noon - 1 p.m. and 10 p.m. - 11 p.m. (repeat)

St. Louis on the Air provides discussion about issues and concerns facing the St. Louis area. The show is produced by Mary Edwards and Alex Heuer and hosted by veteran journalist Don Marsh.

To call in during the noon broadcast call (314) 382-TALK (8255) or email talk@stlpublicradio.org.

Follow the show on Twitter @STLonAir

Subscribe to our e-newsletter, The Talk Studio, to receive previews of upcoming guests, highlights from the most-talked about shows, and questions from our producers.

Local Host(s): 
Don Marsh
Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5182a94ee1c876c646471715|5182a93be1c876c6464716bd

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St. Louis on the Air
5:17 pm
Thu May 2, 2013

A Wealth Of St. Louis Architecture

Wainwright Building
(via Flickr/Reading Tom)

The St. Louis region is rich with architecturally significant and interesting structures and buildings.

There is a mix of traditional American, European and other foreign influences, side by side with a reflection of a more modern style.

The Gateway Arch often draws the most attention as the architectural focal point of St. Louis but many other structures such as the Wainwright Building, one of the world’s first skyscrapers built in 1892, and the Eads Bridge are significant.  Plus, many St. Louis’ neighborhoods are architecturally rich.

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Lobbying
5:00 am
Thu May 2, 2013

Running Tally Of Mo. Lobbyist Gifts: $450,000

Credit Chris McDaniel, St. Louis Public Radio

The running tab for tickets, meals, drinks and other lobbyist gifts hasn't slowed. In just three months this year, lobbyists spent more than $450,000 on legislators in Jefferson City.

Explore the Numbers

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St. Louis on the Air
10:48 am
Wed May 1, 2013

St. Louis Regional Chamber Initiative Hopes To Translate Degrees Into Dollars

(via Flickr/j.o.h.n. walker)

The St. Louis Regional Chamber is launching a collaborative initiative to increase the percentage of the area’s workforce which has a bachelor’s degree or higher.

Thirty percent of adults in the St. Louis region have at least a bachelor’s degree, ranking it 14th among the nation’s metropolitan areas.  That’s just behind Los Angeles and ahead of Houston, according to U.S. Census estimates.  Meanwhile, decades of slow population growth place St. Louis as the 19th most populated region.

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St. Louis on the Air
4:59 pm
Tue April 30, 2013

Spring Gardening Help From The Missouri Botanical Garden

Crocuses
Missouri Botanical Garden

Now that it appears that Spring has arrived in the St. Louis region, the thoughts of many residents are turning to gardening.  Efforts thus far have been frustrating for many because of the varying temperatures and large amount of rain.  Many have delayed their Spring planting, and those who haven’t may find that the few warm days caused vegetables to flower prematurely and that the cold temperatures at night have harmed them.

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St. Louis on the Air
2:45 pm
Mon April 29, 2013

How Do You Be A Friend To A Friend Who's Sick?

Author Letty Cottin Pogrebin
Nadine Markova

Illness is an unfortunate part of the human condition.  At one time or another all of us come to know a friend or relative who is sick.

How should we react?  What should we do?  Should we visit? How long should the visit be?

Host Don Marsh talked with Letty Cottin Pogrebin about these issues and more.  Pogrebin is the author of How to be a Friend to a Friend Who’s Sick.  She says illness is friendship’s proving ground.

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St. Louis on the Air
4:32 pm
Thu April 25, 2013

Honoring The Legacy Of Martin Luther King, Jr. One Street At A Time

Proposed Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Legacy Park illustration at sunset, to be placed at the corner of Hamilton Avenue and Martin Luther King Boulevard
Lauer Architecture

A few years ago a St. Louis non-profit organization, Beloved Streets of America, conducted a study about streets throughout the country which bear the name of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

The study found the majority of MLK streets are unsafe and crime-ridden.  Many are “located in distressed neighborhoods, considered areas where predominately poor blacks live, and viewed as places where whites and non-blacks seldom travel,” according to the organization.

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St. Louis on the Air
11:26 am
Thu April 25, 2013

How Do You Get Rid Of Expired Prescription Drugs?

April 27 is the 6th Annual Prescription Drug Take-Back Day
Flickr/Stephen Cummings

An abundance of prescription medication goes unused or is expired and is at risk of being abused.

This Saturday, April 27, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) holds the sixth annual National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. 

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St. Louis on the Air
5:07 pm
Wed April 24, 2013

Sunday Games, Booze, Cheap Tickets: How St. Louis Played A Huge Role In Keeping Baseball Alive

The 1883 St. Louis Browns, Image from book cover, "The Summer of Beer and Whiskey"
(Courtesy: The Publishers, PublicAffairs)

Baseball and St. Louis go together like beer and brats, and the relationship between the city and sport began more than 130 years ago.

Chris Von der Ahe, a German grocer and beer-garden proprietor, risked his life savings in the 1880s, when he founded the franchise that would become today’s St. Louis Cardinals.

As author Edward Achorn describes in his newest book, Von der Ahe knew little about baseball but would become one of the most important and amusing figures in the game’s history.

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St. Louis on the Air
2:03 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Finding Balance And Dignity Among The Chaos Of Dementia

PET scan of a human brain with Alzheimer's disease
US National Institute on Aging, Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center

Dementia is the broad term which refers to diseases which result in a significant loss of cognitive ability.

Alzheimer’s disease is one of the worst manifestations of dementia.

A symposium at Washington University in St. Louis this week aims to be a gathering place for people struggling to find balance and dignity among the chaos of dementia.

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St. Louis on the Air
3:29 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

Legal Roundtable: Marathon Bomber, Blood Alcohol Test, TIF, Etc.

The Old Courthouse in downtown St. Louis.
(Mike Matney)

Legal questions surround the arrest of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, the suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing who was captured on Friday.

What is the role of the public safety exception as it relates to Miranda rights? Were civil rights violated as a result of the lockdown?  Should Tsarnaev be tried as an enemy combatant as some Republican legislators have suggested?

The questions surrounding the surviving suspect of the Boston Marathon bombing were discussed by a panel of legal experts, as part of our monthly legal roundtable discussion.

The panelists included:

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