St. Louis on the Air | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis on the Air

Noon-1 p.m. and 10-11 p.m. (repeat) Monday-Friday

St. Louis on the Air creates a unique space where guests and listeners can share ideas and opinions with respect and honesty. Whether exploring issues and challenges confronting our region, discussing the latest innovations in science and technology, taking a closer look at our history or talking with authors, artists and musicians, St. Louis on the Air brings you the stories of St. Louis and the people who live, work and create in our region.

The show is produced by Alex HeuerEvie Hemphill and Lara Hamdan. The engineer is Aaron Doerr and production assistance is provided by Charlie McDonald.

St. Louis on the Air is sponsored by The Hammond Institute for Free Enterprise.

Missouri Chief Justice Zel Fisher in January announced coming changes to the state’s pretrial rules, which govern bail, detention and other practices directly impacting citizens accused of a crime.

The new rules, described by Fisher as “common-sense modifications” within a system that too often treats defendants according to their pocketbooks instead of the law, go into effect July 1.

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, St. Louis Public Radio’s Rachel Lippmann will discuss the implications with the presiding judges in both St. Louis city and county courts as well as a local law professor.

Kris Kleindienst is co-owner of Left Bank Books.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Left Bank Books is turning 50 this year, and on Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, co-owner Kris Kleindienst talked about the shop’s storied history with St. Louis Public Radio’s Rachel Lippmann.

Located in St. Louis’ bustling Central West End neighborhood, the independent bookseller got its start in 1969 when a group of Washington University graduate students set out to create a place where one could find all kinds of literature.

Left Bank will formally celebrate its 50-year milestone in October.

From left, Erica Jones, Dr. Brad Warner and Dr. Nicole Wilson joined Tuesday's talk show.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Earlier this month, four St. Louis-area children died as a result of guns over the course of just five days.

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, St. Louis Public Radio’s Rachel Lippmann discussed the ongoing violence and related trauma that many children in the region face – as well as resources and ideas for a way forward.

Joining the discussion were three guests: Erica Jones, who has lost both a 7-year-old godson and an adult daughter to guns in recent years; Dr. Brad W. Warner, the Jessie L. Ternberg MD PhD Distinguished Professor of Pediatric Surgery at Washington University School of Medicine and surgeon-in-chief at St. Louis Children's Hospital; and Dr. Nicole Wilson, pediatric surgery fellow at St. Louis Children's Hospital.

This interview will be on “St. Louis on the Air” at noon Wednesday. This story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

Earlier this month, Pride St. Louis announced that they would no longer allow uniformed police officers to march in this year’s parade. Following much contention, the board announced a reversal of that decision via a  joint press conference with Mayor Lyda Krewsom.

This development follows the historic selection of Metro Trans Umbrella group as the parade’s grand marshal - a break from tradition, as it places a community rather than an individual into that role. The group has publicly disagreed with Pride St. Louis' reversal.

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, St. Louis Public Radio’s Rachel Lippmann will discuss the contention surrounding police presence at the festival, and the broader status of the transgender community in St. Louis.

This interview will be on “St. Louis on the Air” over the noon hour Wednesday. This story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

The United States will advance to the quarterfinals of the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup after a 2-1 victory Monday against Spain. Now they’re set to play the host nation of France this Friday, during a game set to be the most-expensive-to-attend Women’s World Cup game ever.

In anticipation of the game, St. Louis Public Radio’s Rachel Lippmann will delve into the Women’s World Cup and the state of women’s soccer in St. Louis on Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air

(June 24, 20190 Melissa Vatterott (at left) and Rae Miller of the Missouri Coalition for the Environment joined Monday's talk show to discuss the organization's new Known and Grown campaign that helps showcase local farmers.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Earlier this month, the Missouri Coalition for the Environment launched a campaign aimed at getting the word out about farmers who are engaging in responsible agriculture practices by ethically raising animals and growing their food.

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, St. Louis Public Radio’s Rachel Lippmann will delve into what the new Known & Grown project entails, as well as its broader implications for growers and consumers, with the MCE’s food and farm director Melissa Vatterott and local food coordinator Rae Miller.

Nicki Morgan, a co-founder of Hart|Beet Farms, also joined the conversation by phone while at the farm in Lincoln County Missouri. The farm joined Known and Grown in 2018.

(June 24, 2019) David Meyer, senior lecturer in management in the Olin Business School at Washington University in St. Louis, joined Monday's talk show to discuss trade and tariffs as they pertain to Missouri.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Trade is no doubt an integral part of many industries and Missouri is no exception. International trade and investment support hundreds of thousands of jobs in the state. To help foster even more of that, Missouri Governor Mike Parson recently embarked on his first trade trip to Europe – with stops in France, Germany and Switzerland.

Further east of Europe, China is also a major player when it comes to foreign investment in Missouri. But the recent national trade war with China has negatively affected trade and hits regional farmers the hardest.

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, St. Louis Public Radio’s Rachel Lippmann discussed trade and tariffs as they pertain to Missouri and the country with David Meyer, senior lecturer in management in the Olin Business School at Washington University in St. Louis.

KCUR's Brian Ellison (left) and St. Louis Public Radio's Rachel Lippmann joined Friday's talk show to talk about multiple top news stories of the week.
Brian Ellison & St. Louis Public Radio

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, guest host Jim Kirchherr of the Nine Network went behind the headlines to discuss multiple top news stories of the week.

St. Louis Public Radio reporter Rachel Lippmann first joined the program to touch on the future of Missouri’s only abortion clinic. Missouri’s health department has denied a license renewal for the clinic. Planned Parenthood of St. Louis will still be able to continue performing the procedure for now, according to a court order.

And, earlier this week, a former FBI agent who was hired to help with the investigation into former Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens was himself charged. Investigator William Tisaby was indicted on seven felony counts that included multiple perjury charges.

Sugarfire Smoke House is the 2019 readers' choice winner of best restaurant and best barbecue.
Jonathan Gayman | Sauce Magazine

Every year, Sauce Magazine puts its critiques of local bars and eateries to the side and lets readers decide which restaurants and chefs deserve the spotlight.

This year, Sugarfire Smoke House won three Readers’ Choice awards: Favorite Restaurant, Favorite Barbecue and Chef of the Year – which went to Matt Glickert, catering and events chef for Sugarfire 44 in Valley Park, Missouri.

From left, Joe Hess and Daniel Hill joined Friday's talk show.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis’ biggest local music festival gets underway Friday evening and all day Saturday with a lineup that the Riverfront Times has billed as its best yet. Featuring more than 100 performances by St. Louis-based bands across 11 venues, ShowcaseSTL 2019 aims to match that quantity with quality, and organizers have taken a collaborative, input-heavy approach to planning.

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, guest host Jim Kirchherr of the Nine Network talked with RFT music editor Daniel Hill and with Joe Hess, who has spearheaded the curation of the lineup.

This year’s theme is the idea of discovery. The festival presents both long-established artists and emerging ones, in all sorts of musical genres, for concertgoers.

St. Louisan Chris Bolyard of Bolyard's Meat and Provisions in Maplewood joined Wednesday's talk show to talk about his appearance on the new History Channel television series called "The Butcher."
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Many years ago, St. Louisan Chris Bolyard made the decision to switch careers and go from working in restaurants to providing them with an alternative to big-box grocery store meat. He went on to become head butcher and owner of Bolyard’s Meat and Provisions located in Maplewood.

Now the local face will soon be familiar to many across the nation after his appearance on a new History Channel television series called “The Butcher,” which airs 9 p.m. tonight. The goal of the show is to help educate the public on the skills that it takes to butcher whole animals.

Earthbound Beer on Cherokee Street hosted a release party for "The St. Louis Anthology" last Friday. The volume's editor, Ryan Schuessler poses for a picture with Vivian Gibson (at right), whose story "Sun Up to Sundown" is one of nearly 70 pieces in the
Belt Publishing & Ryan Schuessler

Poems about St. Louis’ vibrant Bosnian community. A story of racial segregation in 1907 St. Louis that still resonates. An ode to Imo’s. These are just a few of the nearly 70 locally focused writings that fill “The St. Louis Anthology,” a newly released 240-page book spearheaded by St. Louis native Ryan Schuessler.

“My two biggest goals when putting this together were to have the volume be as diverse and representative as possible,” Schuessler, the editor, has said, “and to have as many first-person narratives [and] takes as possible – as in, having people write about their own experiences, even if they're not writers.”

Described on its back cover as “a love letter to those moments and people … that are so St. Louis,” the anthology “dares to confront the city’s nostalgia and its trauma,” all while celebrating the people who live there.

Joining Tuesday's talk show were (from left) Angela Louis, Lisa Picker and state Sen. Jill Schupp.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

The U.S. remains the only industrialized country that does not provide some form of universal paid family leave. Many American workers continue to have to choose between maintaining their livelihood and caring for loved ones.

There is some momentum in Congress to potentially change that, and meanwhile policy varies widely at the state and employer levels. In the St. Louis region, some organizations are recognizing the positive impact that paid family leave can have, and that trend is the focus of a free Tuesday evening panel titled The Future of Family Leave.

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, St. Louis Public Radio editor Holly Edgell talked with several guests who are participants in that event: Angela Louis, director of administration for Simon Law Firm; Lisa Picker, executive director of the Women’s Foundation of Greater St. Louis; and Missouri Sen. Jill Schupp (D-Creve Coeur).

(L-R) Peggy Holly, Christopher Limber and Mark Abels talked about the 2019 Grand Center Theatre Crawl on Tuesday's "St. Louis on the Air."
Lara Hamdan | St. Louis Public Radio

Next weekend, a two-day pop-up theater experience will take place in and around Grand Center. Participants in the 2019 Grand Center Theatre Crawl will be able to explore new venues while enjoying short performances by over 20 local theater companies.

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, St. Louis Public Radio’s Holly Edgell discussed what all the event will entail with Mark Abels, treasurer of West End Players Guild; Christopher Limber, artistic director of Prison Performing Arts; and Peggy Holly, event founder and lead volunteer organizer.

(June 17, 2019) Author Marie-Christine Williams (at left) and Ron Klutho talked about an upcoming program at the Missouri History Museum to commemorate UN Day in Support of Victims of Torture on Monday's "St. Louis on the Air."
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

From April to July 1994, nearly a million people lost their lives as members of the ethnic Hutu majority slaughtered them during the Rwandan Civil War.

The United Nations solemnizes the tragedy among others by marking June 26 as the UN Day in Support of Victims of Torture. Locally, the Missouri Historical Society has partnered with Bilingual International Assistant Services and the Holocaust Museum and Learning Center to create a program next week titled  Triumph Over Darkness.

Joining Monday's talk show were (from left) Sarah Brown, Steve Hansen and Chris Maples.
Chronicle of Higher Education & St. Louis Public Radio & Missouri S&T

A handful of leaders at St. Louis-area universities are each departing key roles this year. The most recent news of such shifts came last week as both Harris-Stowe State University President Dwaun Warmack and Washington University Provost Holden Thorp announced they are leaving their posts.

In addition, Wash U Chancellor Mark Wrighton and University of Missouri-St. Louis Chancellor Tom George are retiring, while Lindenwood University President Michael Shonrock was let go earlier this year and McKendree University President James Dennis plans to retire after the 2019-2020 academic year.

Joining St. Louis Public Radio’s Jonathan Ahl on St. Louis on the Air to help make sense of this trend and others within higher education were three guests who have been watching it all closely.

Dabke is a native Levantine folk dance performed in a line dance.
Courtesy of Rawan Abusaid

A showcase of Palestinian culture gets underway at noon this Sunday at the World’s Fair Pavilion in Forest Park. Palestinians are often portrayed in the media only when it comes to the Israel-Palestine conflict, but not much is discussed about the nuances of their culture, from the food they eat to the different identities that make up the culture. 

 

Friday's show included the perspectives of St. Louis Public Safety Director Jimmie Edwards (at left), Close the Workhouse representative Inez Bordeaux (center) and Ben & Jerry's co-founder Ben Cohen.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

On Tuesday a federal judge ruled that St. Louis jails cannot hold inmates simply because they cannot make bail. That decision came just one day before a press conference this week at City Hall, where Ben Cohen, co-founder of Ben & Jerry’s, joined representatives of the Close the Workhouse campaign in urging city officials to shut down the Medium Security Institution, known as the workhouse.

Cohen joined Inez Bordeaux, who spent about a month incarcerated in the workhouse in 2016, on St. Louis on the Air for a conversation with St. Louis Public Radio’s Jonathan Ahl. Ahl also spoke with the city’s public safety director, Jimmie Edwards, who gave his perspective on the condition of the workhouse, the cash bail system and related topics.

Julia Bullock and Davóne Tines in "Fire Shut Up in My Bones." [6/14/19]
Eric Woolsey

Terence Blanchard knows from experience that an opera that sounds and looks different from the classic repertory can bring new audiences to an old art form.

“An elderly African American man came up to me” after a performance of Blanchard’s jazz-infused opera "Champion" in 2013, the trumpeter/bandleader recalled, “and he said: Man, if this is opera, I will come.”

With his latest magnum opus, Blanchard wants to continue changing popular perceptions about opera — particularly, what stories it can tell, and who does the telling.

“Fire Shut Up In My Bones,” based on the memoir of New York Times columnist Charles Blow, makes its world premiere Saturday at Opera Theatre of St. Louis.

Brittany Packnett joined Thursday's "St. Louis on the Air."
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Activist, educator and writer Brittany Packnett returns this week to her hometown of St. Louis – the place where she participated in protests after the police shooting of Michael Brown and was appointed to the Ferguson commission in 2014.

Now based in Washington, where she is Teach for America’s vice president of National Community Alliances, Packnett has been described by former President Barack Obama as a leader whose voice “is going to be making a difference for years to come.”

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, she joined St. Louis Public Radio’s Jonathan Ahl for a conversation ahead of her appearance at the Ethical Society of St. Louis Thursday evening. That free event (registration requested) is co-sponsored by Women’s Voices Raised for Social Justice and will be moderated by Fox 2 News' Shirley Washington.

DON'T USE AS FILE PHOTO St. Louis Blues' Alex Pietrangelo carries the Stanley Cup after the Blues defeated the Boston Bruins in Game 7 of the NHL Stanley Cup Final, Wednesday, June 12, 2019, in Boston
AP | Charles Krupa

Updated at 11 a.m., June 13 with details about the championship parade — For the first time in their 52-year history, the St. Louis Blues have hoisted the Stanley Cup.

The Blues defeated the Boston Bruins 4-1 Wednesday night to secure their first-ever National Hockey League championship. When the final buzzer sounded, fans in St. Louis and elsewhere erupted in a long-awaited celebration, as the Blues mobbed their goaltender on the ice in Boston.

The city of St. Louis will honor the team with a parade and rally downtown along Market Street at noon on Saturday. The route starts at 18th Street and ends at Broadway. A rally will be held afterwards at the Gateway Arch. 

Legal experts Brenda Talent (at left), Bill Freivogel (center) and Mark Smith joined Wednesday's show.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

From the continuing drama surrounding abortion access in Missouri to the investigation of St. Louis Metropolitan Police officers whose racist Facebook posts have been in the spotlight, this month’s Legal Roundtable had much to consider during Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air.

The conversation touched on a variety of the latest regional as well as national news stories that bring up questions related to sunshine law, the First Amendment and other legal matters.

(L-R) St. Louis Public Radio's Jonathan Ahl talked with politic editor Fred Ehrlich and reporters Chad Davis and Jason Rosenbaum about changes in the St. Louis County Council County on Tuesday's "St. Louis on the Air."
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

It’s been two months since Sam Page was sworn in as the new county executive replacing Steve Stenger in St. Louis County. On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jonathan Ahl will delve into changes that Page, the former St. Louis County Council chairman, has made, such as seeking to close a pay gap within county government between men and women and advocating for funding towards police body cameras and in-car cameras.

Joining the discussion were STLPR reporters Chad Davis and Jason Rosenbaum and politics editor Fred Ehrlich.

Dr. Mimi Vo (at left) and Rolla City Councilman Daniel Jones talked about the benefits of medical marijuana and what the application process like  for medical marijuana ID cards on Tuesday's "St. Louis on the Air."
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio | Courtesy of Daniel Jones

June 4 marked the first day Missouri posted application forms for patients who want medical marijuana ID cards, which is unprecedented in the state’s history. The application forms are also for would-be marijuana businesses — dispensaries, growers and others. Patients may file the applications beginning July 4, and businesses Aug. 3.

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jonathan Ahl discussed what the legalization of medical marijuana means for Missouri and the process of how physicians prescribe it as dispensaries start opening up.

The moon appears above Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve in this recent photograph by St. Louisan Andy Magee.
Andy Magee

On the first day of 2019, St. Louis resident Andy Magee embarked on an unusual adventure with a goal to visit all 418 National Park Service units around the U.S. within the course of a single year. He’s now five months into that journey – and back in St. Louis this week for a pit stop.

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, he joined St. Louis Public Radio’s Jonathan Ahl to give an update on his travels, which began during the federal government shutdown.

Dr. Martin Orrell (at left) and Dr. John Morley joined Monday's talk show.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

More and more people are experiencing the debilitating effects of Alzheimer’s and other dementias. The Alzheimer’s Association notes that one in three seniors die with dementia, and by 2050 nearly 14 million Americans are expected to be living with it.

Those growing numbers are spurring innovative efforts to treat dementia, including Cognitive Stimulation Therapy, a non-drug treatment that is the focus of a conference taking place Monday and Tuesday at St. Louis University.

Dr. John Morley and Dr. Martin Orrell are among CST’s proponents, and both of them joined St. Louis Public Radio’s Jonathan Ahl on Monday’s St. Louis on the Air to talk about what they and their peers have described as a common-sense approach to treating dementia.

Juliana Hertel and Grace Hardison demonstrate against abortion restrictions during a Planned Parenthood rally in downtown St. Louis. May 30, 2019
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Planned Parenthood is awaiting St. Louis Circuit Court Judge Michael Stelzer’s decision on whether the center is able to renew its abortion clinic license.

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jeremy D. Goodwin will go behind the headlines with health reporter Sarah Fentem to discuss developments in the case this week.

From left, Steven Louis Brawley, Miranda Rectenwald and Paul Thiel joined Friday's talk show.
Lara Hamdan | St. Louis Public Radio

In the wee hours of a Saturday morning in the summer of 1969, nine New York City police officers entered Greenwich Village’s small Stonewall Inn. Police raids of gay bars were a frequent occurrence at the time, but this particular instance was different.

This time, people around the Stonewall fought back, and the ensuing several days of confrontation between police and activists greatly accelerated the growth of the gay rights movement.

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jeremy D. Goodwin led a discussion reflecting on the Stonewall uprising of 50 years ago and what was happening among the local LGBTQ community at that time. Joining the conversation will be Steven Louis Brawley, Paul Thiel and Miranda Rectenwald.

Trees along Leonor K Sullivan Boulevard are seen surrounded by rising water on Tuesday as the Mississippi River reaches a near-record height.
File Photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Andrea Mcmanus and her three children had lived in their apartment in Grafton for less than six months before they evacuated to escape the rising Mississippi River floodwaters.

They left on March 22, as the flood overtook Grafton and began rising downstream in St. Louis. The Mississippi has been above flood stage at St. Louis for more than 80 days and last weekend surpassed the 1973 level, the second highest on record.

Many residents, government officials and scientists compare it to the Great Flood of 1993, when the river crested at 49.6 feet, the highest flood on record for the St. Louis region. Some residents worry that it could surpass that height.

Circus Flora

Circus Flora is a longstanding tradition for many St. Louisans and is back in action this month for its 33rd season. This year’s show is bringing audiences to an unlikely place for an adventure – a grocery store. Schnucks, to be exact. 

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jeremy D. Goodwin talked about how “The Caper in Aisle 6” takes a usually mundane trip to the store and turns it into an exciting visual performance for circusgoers. 

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